The way to freedom

How do we find true freedom?

This question is one that concerns me for all because it can often mean something different for everyone and then consciously or subconsciously that’s how we end up seeking it. The need or feeling to be free is like an innate drive within us, the great thing is however that it can be fulfilled far easier than we may realise.

So how?

Firstly it’s begins in our minds, this is where all freedom and focus starts, we can actually be in what may be perceived by others as a limiting situation and still feel very free.

So what is most important in our minds is how we are focusing and where it’s coming from;

For example- if our focus is coming from a past painful experience that we are wanting to move away from- this can actually limit us far more than free us. The reason being is that the very act of moving away from something already has a limit tied within it, because it’s linked to pain, although this can be a drive in some way, the fear and pain are still there.

Alternatively when moving towards freedom – you are driven by a cause and in addition having accepted or healed any pain left behind. So even though the pain may initially have drove you it is the cause that than enables you to seek and find the way to freedom both within and out.

Faith is also very important and is really a prerequisite to finding true inner freedom, for without it fear can still be the driver and therefore limiting the way forward.

If we look at some of the great examples, Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela and Daisaku Ikeda they have all been driven by a great cause, that allowed them to achieve great outcomes and freedom not only for themselves but for many along with them.

We too can follow in their footsteps and have this type of true freedom creating beautiful waves along with us, when we base our lives on such a cause. 🙏

Miranda

Tribute to Nelson Mandela (extracts from essay by Daisaku Ikeda)

Thanking the Spoon

A victory of hope over despair, of shared humanity over hatred, and of justice over inequality… these are my thoughts reflecting on the legacy of Nelson Mandela, who passed away this evening. My admiration for Mandela comes mostly from reading essays by Daisaku Ikeda, leader of the Soka Gakkai Buddhist movement that I belong to.

Mandela heard about Ikeda’s humanistic writings while in prison and after his release requested a meeting with him during a visit to Japan. Here are some extracts from an essay written by Daisaku Ikeda, reflecting on the two dialogues he had with South Africa’s first black President:

Nelson Mandela & Daisaku Ikeda

“There is something very special about Nelson Mandela’s smile. It is honest and pure, full of gentle composure. There isn’t a single line on his face that would suggest anything cold and harsh. And yet it embodies the conviction and strength of character of a man who has…

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